Circles: A Soft Bend

I’d led a sheltered life. I was thirty years old before I visited my first Saddlebred barn. I was just tagging along with a friend, standing flat-footed in the aisle, when I heard a yell, followed by a loud rattling noise. At the far end of an extremely long barn aisle, a tall horse with wide eyes was jangling toward me with a rider up. I backed against a stall as the noise got louder.  He flew past me, knees high and chains clanging in a gait something like a trot.

They pulled up at the other far end of the aisle, awkwardly turned around and clip-clopped a walk back toward us, stilted and sweating. The rider stopped and exchanged greetings with my friend, while I did a squint-eyed stare at the gelding’s long hooves –wedged, weighted, and screwed together with metal strapping.

It was a lot to take in; I must have looked like a gaped-mouth tourist. Back in the truck, I grilled my friend who explained that they sprinted the horses up and down their barn aisles, keeping their horses straight because riding in circles “ruined horses.”

Do you know the good reasons to circle a horse? No extremes, I don’t mean tiny circles at a dead run, but the idea of walking or trotting a large arc? Imagine your horse’s barrel; the inside ribs should compress a bit while the outside ribs stretch. Most of us will say that our horses are stiff one way and this is the peaceful antidote. It’s common sense to want your horse supple and strong.

Here is the secret to riding a circle: Start by visualizing a circle on the ground. Then cut the circle into quarters and ride it one-quarter at a time. It’s a way of staying fresh and mentally in the moment. If you want, count the steps in each quarter. Let the strides stay regular and keep your shoulders at the angle you want your horse’s shoulder to be.

Warning: the more you think you need to steer with reins, the more “creative” your circle will be. Sometimes from the ground, I feel a need to clarify by saying round circle as a reminder.

Yes, horses have a stiff side in the beginning but the more you pull that side to make them bend, the more things come apart; shoulders dropping in all directions, over-correcting with reins, tense eyebrows and set jaws on riders, and confused ears on your horse. Scratch his withers for tolerating you.

Start again, care more about the track you see on the ground than the bend of your horse’s neck. Ride that track. Sit squarely in the saddle and turn your waist, shoulders to the arc of the circle, one-quarter at a time. Ride with an energetic seat and legs, remember? And breathe. If that doesn’t help your circle, don’t be shy. Put some cones out. This is important for your horse.

Inside leg to outside rein. 

It’s an imaginary interior line from your horse’s armpit (where your foot is) to his outside shoulder. Ignore his head for now. Every time his barrel sways to the outside, your calf will pulse lightly. No, lightly! Let it feel like a dancing cheek to cheek. The concept of bend must be in the ribs, meaning the whole body, as opposed to cranking his neck to the side.

Keep pulsing along at the walk and look down. If you are going his soft way, usually to the left, you will notice your inside rein slack as he softens to your gentle inside calf muscle. You want to see his withers being gently and rhythmically massaged to the outside of the circle. You want that outside arc of his body as sweet as a crescent moon, as soft as a peach.

After a while, reverse direction. He might counter bend a bit. Keep the inside leg massaging away but lower your expectations. It takes a good while; you can’t make muscles release. Let your horse do that part. Remind yourself that a counter-bend isn’t a disobedience; it’s literally an under-developed muscle; his withers need time. Horses are born this way and if you create more resistance while asking him to bend his stiff way, that does defeat the purpose. Think long neck. Think of him stretching nose to tail. Pass the time breathing.

Remind yourself that curving or walking in an arc is a calming signal for a reason. This flexing of the horse’s ribcage relaxes them. Wait for him to tell you it’s working. He might blow out a snort, or lick and chew. Maybe his neck will get longer, maybe his stride will improve, his inside leg energized by your inside pulsing calf. These are all right answers. Say, Good Boy.

Once the circles are good, try a spiral. Start with a 20-meter circle, carve it smaller with your outside leg pulsing (in rhythm as his barrel swings to the inside to move smaller) as you turn your waist a bit more, to a 15-meter circle, and adding energy to your sit bones, even smaller to a 10-meter circle. Once there, use your inside leg to gradually move out to 20-meters again.

To begin just do a smaller circle inside of a larger one. Let this spiral have a chance to blossom as your horse gets more supple. If you are on the trail, plan a path using huge half-circle arcs instead of straight lines. Ride with your legs. Ask for slow, long strides, giving your horse time to step under. Stay mentally engaged; ride with energy and practice your own internal focus by feeling each step. Know that he is gaining strength from the inside out. Be patient. Think of coiling the spring, think T’ai Chi for horses.

If you find circles boring, reconsider. We don’t ride them to please judges. There’s a much better reason than that: Supple Bend Equals Longevity.

Is there a better reason?

….

Anna Blake at Infinity Farm
Horse Advocate, Author, Speaker, Equine Pro
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22 thoughts on “Circles: A Soft Bend

  1. Carole Harding

    I have practiced a similar exercise many, many times. What has been missing is the poetic flow, the gentleness, the quiet asking, the partnership.
    Wishing today was a barn day so I could put this in practice. Thank you. And Koi (my tolerant horse) thanks you.

  2. Cathie Johnson

    This will be so helpful for me, I should frame it! I have been focusing so hard on getting her to engage her hinds that our circles are a mess. She is a green, 17 and never been taught to use her hinds. I think the trainers that have tried to help are expecting too much too soon. Have you written a book on your methods or can you recommend one to me? Or a video? Thank you for your help!

      1. Cathie Johnson

        Do you recommend the kindle or paperback? Are there pictures and diagrams? If so, I need to get the paperback. Thanks again from Snow and me!

      2. I don’t know… there are photos but not illustrations…and the photos are like the ones I use on the blog… I don’t know which version to recommend. Sorry.

  3. eremophila

    The image of that poor saddle horse shocked me and to think of it being part of that culture is horrific! I know some harness horses have their shoes weighted and even that seems bad…..
    Reading on circles brought back the memory of the feeling of the beautiful bounce of hinds pushing into a supple body – I loved circles! Bittersweet memories of times past.

    1. I should say that Saddlebreds in the 80s is nothing like Big Lick horses now… but when I work with gaited horses now, we walk circles. Bittersweet is right, great comment.

  4. Melissa Guest

    LOVE this! Thank you Anna! This is what my coach has been telling me. You back it up so well in words. I will read read and read again!

      1. ferlonda

        Well, I surely do appreciate your dedication not “just” to horses but to the betterment of their lot in life and in educating people about them.

  5. My Morgan high steps naturally, on his own, when he feels like it, & boy he is fancy. He can also single-foot past most horses trotting briskly & make it look effortless. He’s never worn a shoe, much less been stacked & banded& chained…. even just that visual makes me sad & angry for the horses who suffer under ignorant “trainers”.

    Circles, bend, longevity… all of that, I like. Very much.

  6. JKS

    Ok now I’m pretty sure you’re stalking me. We just started working spirals for the challenge of it, on top of working with the garrocha for fun (and challenge) because come on- trying to ride a perfect circle, with one hand on the reins, it’s ALL your seat. And we’re doing this now because we’re ready. He’s ready to build the muscle you can only build by keeping the steady arc and not squaring off corners (like he usually does) and I’m ready to TRULY let go of the perception that my hands have anything to do with direction (conceptually I know they don’t- but try telling my hands that). But above all, it’s because of those magic words- supple bend equals longevity. He’s not getting any younger, but he IS still getting stronger.

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